1. I co-wrote a book on successful complete street redesigns around the United States. If you’re interested in a free copy, visit http://www.rethinkingstreets.com to request one. We have a limited number left, but we’ll try to accommodate your request!

    I co-wrote a book on successful complete street redesigns around the United States. If you’re interested in a free copy, visit http://www.rethinkingstreets.com to request one. We have a limited number left, but we’ll try to accommodate your request!
  2. Really nice intersection design that could be employed just about anywhere in the United States.

  3. thisbigcity:

    The city of Zurich partnered with designers to deliver a drive-up (bike-up?) table for bikers to enjoy a cup of coffee without having to get off their ride.

    (via thenewurbanist)

  4. I love the Indianapolis Cultural trail. In some places, engineers gave auto space over to bikes and peds and transformed the corridor in the process. The details like paving, crosswalks, and signage feel really high quality — this doesn’t feel like a trial or retrofit like many bike/ped projects do. Well done, Indy!

  5. Street grid diagrams from Allan Jacob’s “Great Streets.”

    (via spaceandshape)

    Street grid diagrams from Allan Jacob’s “Great Streets.”
  6. Details in the Urban Façade


    I’ve written about street texture before, but a recent trip to Brooklyn provided an excellent example of the importance of getting that texture just right.

    State Street, Brooklyn, New York

    I took Sunday morning stroll in the Boerum Hill neighborhood and happened upon a block of State Street that had one side lined with brownstones on the historic register and the other with recently constructed townhomes. In general, the new homes complement the historic buildings well. They are of a similar height, they have nice front stoops, and use the same material palette. You can tell the architect of the new townhomes was trying hard to balance the style of old brownstones with a modern aesthetic based on clean lines and an honesty about the materials. For instance, the new townhomes don’t have lintels above the windows because their brick façades aren’t load-bearing like the historic façades. The brick is just a veneer and is detailed accordingly.

    A close-up look at the two sets of façades

    All of this honesty and modernity creates stark façades when compared to their historic neighbors. The historic homes aren’t even as richly detailed as some townhomes of the same period, but simple elements like a decorative cornice, lintels, divided lites in the windows, and a rusticated base add human-scale texture that creates a charm and warmth modern structures of a similar type haven’t been able to match. Modern architecture is in many ways about stripping away the artifice that makes these historic buildings so successful. Ornament isn’t useless, it helps us feel comfortable in an urban environment that could easily feel monolithic and cold. Such ornament can be eschewed in buildings like skyscrapers, where the primary vantage point for viewing the building is often miles away. But when a building is up close and serves as a residence, modern architecture isn’t as successful as its traditional counterpart.

  7. Copenhagen adds bicycle superhighways to their list of infrastructure innovations

    The video that accompanies the article is great, especially the couple that cycled to the hospital to have their baby.

  8. What a great use of rural roads! More context below.

    Via schlossb:

    "The car lane is only wide enough for one vehicle, although it is a two way road. When vehicles approach each other, they must yield to each other and any cyclists present."

  9. Eugene’s EmX service in 2062?


    Click here for a full-sized PDF of the map.

    Eugene’s bus rapid transit system, EmX, is at a fork in the road. In one direction, a new west Eugene extension of the system is killed by vocal opponents. In the other, the extension is built. I believe that if the first path is chosen, bus rapid transit in Eugene will see little to no future expansion. Lane Transit District (LTD) will be approaching any future expansion from a weak position, where any neighborhood or business groups can organize and defeat it because they have seen how it can be done.

    LTD’s current vision for EmX map. Not very attractive.

    My map is a glimpse 50 years into the future if the west Eugene extension is built. Down this path, future expansion efforts are successful and residents begin to see the benefits of a strong network of frequent bus service. I think LTD has a problem explaining their vision for EmX, and how it will eventually serve all major corridors in the area. Residents now don’t see how the west Eugene extension fits into the vision of an expansive network. My map gives Eugene and Springfield residents that vision into the future in an attractive, exciting (for a map) way.

    Notes on the map

    All of the new routes on my map came from LTD’s future EmX corridor map above. I simplified a few routes and didn’t include the “perimeter” route that would follow the beltline highway. I just couldn’t figure how BRT on that highway route would work and connect with other lines. Also, LTD’s map just shows corridors, so in some cases it was clear what would constitute a route, but in other cases (like Coburg/Harlow/Gateway) I had to guess. I placed stations on the new routes at significant intersections at roughly the same distance apart as the existing EmX stations.

    Detail of downtown Eugene and the UO

    Downtown Eugene was the trickiest part of the map due to the concentration of routes. For the most part, the stations on all of the routes make sense relative to each other, though I drastically simplified the area around Eugene Station by creating one large dot.

    My hope is that this map won’t be taken as a literal set-in-stone plan for the future of EmX, but a possible scenario for a vast, connected network of frequent transit service in 50 years. While I probably won’t be in Eugene to ride it, I hope something like this gets built! To learn more about the efforts to support EmX visit West EmX Yes!

    Thanks to Transit Maps for the inspiration and instruction that made my map possible!

  10. This project in Teruel, Spain splits the square in two. How do you get from a business on one side to a business on another? The building is just too big for the space it occupies. Not a particularly thoughtful piece of urban design.

    This project in Teruel, Spain splits the square in two. How do you get from a business on one side to a business on another? The building is just too big for the space it occupies. Not a particularly thoughtful piece of urban design.